Rough week: betrayed by her dealer and the cops.

Lynette Rae Sampson was was just doing some meth when it struck her, she'd had better meth before. Someone has been messing with her meth. 

Not one to be ripped off, she called the cops to investigate. They would be able to tell how pure her meth was, and, bonus, if she had been ripped off, now she had some pros to handle her case. 

According to an Enid, OK police affidavit, Officer Aaron Barber went to her house to investigate. When he got there, he knocked on the door, and Sampson greeted him with, “I’m glad you came.”

Niceties out of the way, she told him that she was concerned her "ice" was not up to snuff, then promptly led him to her stash -- a tin container, a couple bags of "quarters" (as in quarters of ounces? as in she hides her laundry money buried in her meth? we don't know!), and a hollowed out lightbulb -- all full of distressingly impure crank Sampson was certain had been "laced."

Relieved that she had an expert on the case, she was free to retire to the living room to sweat profusely and hear voices. 

When officer Barber asked Sampson if she had been doing the meth, she told him she had smoked some of it a couple hours ago, but asked him to please not take her to jail. 

Of course, the cop betrayed her trust and arrested her. Now she is facing a felony charge of possession and a misdemeanor for the paraphernalia, which could land her in the slammer for up to ten years and a fine of up to $5,000 on the felony. 

Enid police Capt. Jack Morris said, "such cases are what keep police work interesting." 

So keep that tip with you, the point where being interesting becomes a crime is meth.

(by Myka Fox)

Sources: Enid News