Dana Snay in a rare moment of thoughtful repose. (Pic via Facebook, h/t Yahoo! Shine)

Up to now, parents only had to worry about their kids destroying their own reputations and job prospects with their Facebook oversharing. One kid from Florida changed all that when she showed how one braggy Facebook post can empty her parents' bank account, or make a serious dent in it, at least.

Dana Snay is the daughter of Patrick Snay, 69, a former headmaster at Gulliver prep school in Miami. In 2010, the school didn't renew Patrick Snay's contract, and he sued for age discrimination. In 2011, the school settled, and Snay was awarded an $80,000 settlement, as well as back pay and lawyer's fees. 

According to The Miami Herald, the settlement included a standard confidentiality clause, prohibiting Snay from going public with the terms or existence of the settlement. Unfortunately, Snay didn't realize that people of his daughter's generation find ideas like "confidentiality" to be antithetical to their "update the world with every single thing that happens to you" ethos. So when he told her about the win, she immediately bragged about the settlement on Facebook.

"Mama and Papa Snay won the case against Gulliver," her post read. "Gulliver is now officially paying for my vacation to Europe this summer. SUCK IT."

The Miami Herald reports that Dana posted that after having graduated Gulliver, and her father had stated in depositions that his daughter suffered "psychological scars" while attending the school. So, she might have been waiting impatiently to give her former classmates and teachers that all-caps "SUCK IT."

Unfortunately for Dana's Eurail pass, the post went out to many Gulliver students and alumni, and before long, it reached Gulliver's attorneys. A motion was filed to squash the settlement based on Patrick Snay's violation of its confidientiality terms. Snay managed to win a ruling to enforce the settlement, but this past Wednesday the school appealed the enforcement and won.

Dana Snay is currently a student at Boston College, for which that $80K probably could have covered at least part of a semester. No word on if her Europe trip ever panned out.

Lessons for parents: Either block your kids from Facebook, or do like most good parents do and hide all details of your lives from your children. Engaging kids on a personal level is a dangerous, costly business. Be safe, don't even tell them what you do for a living or where the money's coming from. Use fake names if you have to. It's the only way to hang onto your cash.

It's so much easier when they're babies and you can throw their pics on Facebook and turn them into wildly popular memes.

(by Bob Powers)

Sources: Miami Herald | H/T Yahoo! Shine